Click to expand some sample answers that our dermatologists have given on a number of conditions. As you can see below, there are many medical conditions that can be possible in your "intimate" area. The information is intended to be informational only. If you would like a dermatologist to review your images, please submit a case.
  • [expand title="Bacterial Vaginosis - A bacterial infection in women"] The fish-like smell and discharge you refer to may point to a condition known as bacterial vaginosis. This is a bacterial infection which can come about as a result of an imbalance in the normal bacterial flora of the vagina. It can be treated with antibiotics such as Metronidazole. A prescription will be needed from your gynecologist, dermatologist or STD clinic physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Balanitis - Inflammation of the foreskin in men"] Possibly BALANITIS, inflammation of the foreskin and/or glans of the penis (the “head”). Very common and not contagious. Treatment with topical steroids (eg hydrocortisone 1%, over-the-counter) twice daily for 1 week, then once daily for 1 week and, finally, once every 2 days for 2 weeks is recommended. To avoid recurrences you can also use moisturizing cream several times daily. Also avoid exaggerated hygiene, which dries out the skin and delays healing. Use mild soap or only luke warm water when washing. During sex or masturbation apply lubricant to avoid friction. Recurrences are common but can be treated the same way. If the condition doesn’t improve, see a dermatologist. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Condyloma - Genital warts in men and women"] Possibly CONDYLOMA (genital warts), a sexually transmitted disease caused by the Human Pamillomavirus (HPV). Condylomas can appear on the skin in any part of the genital area. The warts can vary in size but are usually flesh-colored and cauliflower-like on the surface. To avoid further spread of the virus, condom use is recommended. They can be treated in many ways. A common technique is to have them removed by freezing them with liquid nitrogen. See a dermatologist or visit a STD-clinic. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Fibroma - A skin colored lesion that is not dangerous"] Possibly a FIBROMA, a benign, usually soft and skin-coloured lesion. Nevertheless, the images are a bit out-of-focus so it is difficult to be 100% sure. If it grows or more lesions appear, I recommend that you have it looked at by a dermatologist. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Folliculitis - Inflammation of the hair roots"] Possibly FOLLICULITIS, an inflammation of the hair roots. At the moment it does not look infected, but I would recommend applying a topical steroid cream and keeping the area clean with antibacterial soaps. This can improve the symptoms. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Fordyce Spots or Tyson Glands - Little white bumps that are completely normal and common"] Possibly SEBACEOUS GLANDS (Fordyce spots or Tyson glands). These little white "bumps" are completely normal. They are so-called sebaceous glands, small glands within the skin that produce the sebum that lubricates our skin and the hair follicles. They are often particularly visible in the genital area where the skin is rather thin and "semi-transparent". The white color is due to the color of the fat that makes up the sebum. As mentioned, this is completely normal and does not require medical attention. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Genital Herpes - A virus that you have for life if you get infected"] Possibly GENITAL HERPES, an infection caused by the Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) type 1 or 2. This virus spreads through unprotected sexual contact. Small blisters in a group surrounded by red inflamed skin is the typical appearance. Since you had a fever prior to the lesions appearing in the skin, this is probably the primary (first) infection. The lesions usually heal within 7-10 days but can sometimes take longer the first time they appear. Treatment with antiviral drugs (aciclovir or valaciclovir, prescription required) can be useful to lessen the symptoms, especially if taken during the first hours or 2-3 days of the outbreak. The virus can unfortunately not be eliminated from the body, so new episodes of herpes can be expected. However, the frequency and intensity is very variable. To avoid further spread, condom use is recommended. A visit to a STD-clinic is also recommended to confirm the diagnosis. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Genital Neurodermatitis - Can cause intense and continuous itching"] Possibly GENITAL HERPES, an infection caused by the Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) type 1 or 2, but it could also be GENITAL NEURODERMATITIS, a small area of dermatitis that is difficult to heal due to intense and continuous itching. Unfortunately, the images are a bit out-of-focus and it is hard to see if the typical small blisters seen in herpes are visible. Herpes generally produces small blisters in a group surrounded by red inflamed skin. The lesions usually heal within 7-10 days but can sometimes take longer the first time they appear. Treatment with antiviral drugs (aciclovir or valaciclovir, prescription required) can be useful to lessen the symptoms, especially if taken during the first hours or 2-3 days of the outbreak. The virus can unfortunately not be eliminated from the body, so new episodes of herpes can be expected. However, the frequency and intensity is very variable. To avoid further spread, condom use is recommended. If the lesions do not disappear, it might be another diagnosis such as neurodermatitis. This diagnosis can be treated with topical steroids, moisturizers and by avoiding scratching. A visit to a STD-clinic or a dermatologist is recommended to confirm the diagnosis. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Herpes - A virus that appears on the lips or genital area"] Possibly HERPES, an infection caused by the Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV). The majority of the adult population have this infection. Small blisters in a group surrounded by red inflamed skin is the typical appearance. The lesions usually heal within 7 days but can sometimes take longer the first time they appear. The virus can unfortunately not be eliminated from the body, so new episodes of herpes can be expected. However, the frequency and intensity is very variable. If you have frequent problems with this, treatment with antiviral drugs (aciclovir or valaciclovir, prescription required) can be useful to lessen the symptoms, especially if taken during the first hours or 2-3 days of the outbreak. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Hypermelanosis - Dark brown spots in the genital region"] Possibly HYPERMELANOSIS, increased pigmentation causing darker brown spots in the genital region. Benign condition which requires no treatment. If the spots grow or change in appearance see a dermatologist. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Ingrown Hairs - Can be caused by shaving"] Possibly INGROWN HAIR on penis shaft. This may have been caused by shaving. The shaved hair can sometimes have a hard time finding its way out of the skin but continues growing in the skin causing a certain degree of inflammation. Try to avoid picking at it, since this can sometimes make it worse or cause an infection. This my resolve itself and, if necessary, it can be surgically removed. The itching under your scrotum may be due to DERMATITIS, inflammation of the skin due to dry skin or irritation. Scratching makes it worse. Symptoms may improve with a moisturizing cream and a topical steroid cream. If no improvement is noted, see a dermatologist. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Linchen Planus - An inflammation of oral mucusa"] Possibly LICHEN PLANUS a inflammatory condition which can affect the oral mucosa but also the skin (commonly the wrists) and/or the genital area. On the skin, slightly raised reddish-violaceous lesions can appear. On the oral mucosa, white lines such as the ones in your images can appear. Nevertheless, the images are a bit out-of-focus. To exclude thrush completely, a culture would be recommended. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Molluscum Contagiosum - Contagious skin condition caused by a virus"] Possibly MOLLUSCUM CONTAGIOSUM, a benign but contagious skin condition caused by a poxvirus. Skin-to-skin contact with a person with the virus can cause these small "bumps" known as papules to appear. These bumps are often shiny and have a small indentation in the middle. Molluscum lesions can clear spontaneously after several months but can also be treated by curettage (scraping them off) at a STD clinic or by a dermatologist. These lesions can probably not be attributed to your Accutane treatment. However, the dry and itchy skin on your legs and the blood in your nose may be due to this treatment. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Normal Skin"] Possibly NORMAL SKIN. Although the images you have sent are a bit out-of-focus, the skin shows no signs of disease. The description you give of a dark brown, uneven, elevated and itching lesion can't be seen but sounds like it could be a mole or something you should show your doctor. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Pearly Penile Papules - Harmless flesh colored bumps"] Possibly PEARLY PENILE PAPULES, small pearly or flesh-colored bumps that can form on the ridge of the glans (the "head") of the penis. This is a harmless anatomical variation and not a disease. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Pox Virus - Contagious skin condition caused by a virus"] Possibly MOLLUSCUM CONTAGIOSUM. Benign but contagious skin condition caused by a poxvirus. Skin-to-skin contact with a person with the virus can cause these small "bumps" known as papules to appear. Often shiny and with a small indentation in the middle. Molluscum lesions can clear spontaneously after several months but can also be treated by curettage (scraping them off) at a STD clinic or by a dermatologist. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Sebaceous Glands - Little white bumps that are normal and not harmful"] Possibly SEBACEOUS GLANDS. These little white "bumps" are completely normal. They are so-called sebaceous glands, small glands within the skin that produce the sebum that lubricates our skin and the hair follicles. They are often particularly visible in the genital area where the skin is rather thin and "semi-transparent". The white color is due to the color of the fat that makes up the sebum. As mentioned, this is completely normal and does not require medical attention. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Sebaceous Cyst - Little white bumps that are normal and not harmful"] Possibly a SEBACEOUS CYST, a benign little white "bump" that can sometimes appear within the skin when pores from so-called sebaceous glands get clogged up. The sebacoeous glands produce the sebum that lubricates our skin and the hair follicles. The white color is due to the color of the fat that makes up the sebum and a protein known as keratin which accumulates in the cyst. They are often particularly visible in the genital area where the skin is rather thin and "semi-transparent". As mentioned, they are benign and do not require medical attention. However, they can be removed surgically if they bother you too much. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Seborrhoeic Keratosis - Wart like lesion that can appear anywhere on the body"] Possibly CONDYLOMA (genital wart), a sexually transmitted disease caused by the Human Pamillomavirus (HPV) or a SEBORRHOEIC KERATOSIS, a wart-like benign skin lesion which can appear anywhere on the body. For a more certain diagnosis, see a dermatologist or visit a STD-clinic. They can be treated in many ways. A common technique is to have them removed by freezing them with liquid nitrogen. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Urethritis - Inflammation of the urethra"] Possibly URETHRITIS, an inflammation of the urethra. Redness, pain and/or discharge are common symptoms. This can be caused by several different bacteria or viruses and may be a sexually transmitted disease, but can also be caused by irritation or chemicals. If you have had unprotected sex within the past months I would recommend that you visit a STD clinic. Antibiotic treatment may be needed. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Vaginitis - Inflammation of the vaginal skin"] Possibly VAGINITIS, inflamed skin in the area surrounding the vaginal opening and the outside of the vagina (vulva). This can be due to dermatitis (inflamed skin), friction during sexual intercourse, yeast infections, bacterial vaginosis (an infection caused by overgrowth of normal vaginal bacteria) or STDs. Testing at an STD clinic is recommended before initiating treatment. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]
  • [expand title="Water Warts - Contagious skin condition caused by a virus"] Possibly MOLLUSCUM CONTAGIOSUM or "water warts", a benign but contagious skin condition caused by a poxvirus. Skin-to-skin contact with a person with the virus can cause these small "bumps" known as papules to appear. These bumps are often shiny and have a small indentation in the middle. Molluscum lesions can clear spontaneously after several months but can also be treated by curettage (scraping them off) at a STD clinic or by a dermatologist. These lesions can probably not be attributed to your Accutane treatment. However, the dry and itchy skin on your legs and the blood in your nose may be due to this treatment. This message is provided as general information only. It does not create a physician-patient relationship, and is not a diagnosis or treatment plan, for which you should consult your personal physician. [/expand]